Weekly Photo Challenge: Reflections … on tea, çay, chai and my personal, globalized reality


An American in Paris, with a Turkish-American life partner after teaching in the Netherlands, with a new boiled wool clementine-colored coat crafted in Tunisia, a favorite self-portrait that gets at my #personalglobalizedreality

Source: twitter.com via Liz on Pinterest

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Early this morning, Esma the hippie puppet woke me with a whisper, saying only “it’s a new day – and you need to reflect on your personal globalized reality.” Helping me to take sips of strong glass of lemony, sugary çay made from Black Sea bred Rize tea bushes she kept repeating “reflection” over and over again. So, I did. And I focused on the muse of the moment, tea. It is not the milky, honeyed tea of my New England youth, usually an Earl Grey, Assam blend or English Breakfast brewed *just so* by my meticulous Mom, obsessed with the rules of proper tea service, even in our eccentric home.

My puppet-delivered çay brings me smooth comfort and a hint of Aegean sun when it is most needed in cold New England months, it has become equal in its comfort currency to the above-mentioned “cuppa” here in this Turkish American household. Deep in the process of sipping shallow swallows from the tiny glass, I consider the other regular teas in my life – the milky-sweet Nepali spiced chai I learned to make from a friend’s Nepali Mum long ago even though the friendship has changed – and the Kenyan chai my brother made, taught firsthand by a Masai family he spent time with in his youth (minus the nip of cow’s blood). Never mind that my bro dubbed that particular chai “the colon blaster” during our mis-spent slacker years…

Turkish Tea

Turkish Tea (Photo credit: joana hard)

And all of this tea reflection reminded me of yet another aspect of my personal, globalized reality. It is much more than the Turkish-American vortex that I have come to reside in – it is much more patchworked and global in nature, as these small sets of words about tea reveal. And that’s when Esma, the hippie puppet with the creative (and hidden competitive edge), hit me with a proposal. “M’lady, she said, “you need to submit to this week’s photo challenge over at WordPress. The theme is reflection. I learned about it on our e-friend Madhu’s blog – you know –The Urge to Wander where she highlights two lovely and engaging photos today.” Shifting in her seat on my shoulder, she pressed on, saying “Remember that photograph you took as a self-portrait last year? You should submit it – it represents your personal globalized reality to a t.” My original caption for this photo was “An ethnically mixed American with a Turkish-American life partner looking at French art deco antiques in a New England market recovering from jetlag after teaching in the Netherlands, wearing a new boiled wool clementine-colored coat crafted in Tunisia” The multiple reflections of me in this photo make this my favorite self-portrait that gets at my #personalglobalizedreality

And so I got up, looked at Madhu’s latest wonders in photography and here I am entering my photo to a contest for the first time in my life. I suppose this could reflect the new leaf that the puppets encouraged me to take yesterday, during their protest against November.

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This entry was posted in Puppets on the move around the world, Turkish Food!, Visits from the Karagöz puppets and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

12 Responses to Weekly Photo Challenge: Reflections … on tea, çay, chai and my personal, globalized reality

  1. Alan says:

    . . and there was me thinking you’d been at the crystals – now I’ve taken a second, third and proper look and it really is rather nice and very you!

  2. Anonymous says:

    It’s always a crap shoot over here re: whether it is the odd brain or the crystals! Thank you for the compliment!

  3. Pingback: Weekly Photo Challenge: Reflections | I do Book Reviews

  4. E. says:

    Reblogged this on Liz Cameron and commented:

    As I work my way towards the turn of a new leaf – I am going to embrace the WordPress weekly photo challenge. I hope you will enjoy my first foray into this realm – on the subject of reflection.

  5. Pingback: Weekly Photo Challenge: Foggy Reflections | Humbled Pie

  6. Pingback: WEEKLY PHOTO CHALLANGE – REFLECTIONS « Dear Bliary

  7. Pingback: Weekly Photo Challenge: Reflections (2) « What's (in) the picture?

  8. Pingback: Weekly Photo Challenge: Reflections (4) « What's (in) the picture?

  9. Nancy says:

    And it’s a winnah, ladies and gentlemen! You have, m’dear, completely awed me with this post. With Emma, clever thing that she is, and the break-through thinking she has contributed. AND with the photo. I had to look and look and look . . . and I love the color of clementines. And patchwork people. Espcially the global ones. And tea. Especially the Turkish kind . . .

  10. Pingback: Weekly Photo Challenge: Reflections (5) « What's (in) the picture?

  11. E. says:

    Dear Nancy, to be Declared a winner in New England parlance is such an honor from you. I am so glad that you enjoyed the post and the picture. I am particularly proud of the picture, but after I took it it was only then that I realized all that it represented. I have really been exploring the photographer side of myself, and enjoying it so much. It’s something I can do with my right hand since my left is all bound up. Thank you so much and I’m sending a strong hug. Love, Liz

  12. Sanjida says:

    The Absent Game Among me and my husband we have owned far more MP3 garems over the years than I can count, such as Sansas, iRivers, iPods (common & touch), the Ibiza Rhapsody, etc. But, the last few years I’ve settled down to one line of players .

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